Tagged: malheur nwr

ASC 43rd Annual Malheur Field Trip 2013 – Day Three (25 May)

Audubon Society of Corvallis’ 43rd Annual Field Trip to Malheur NWR — Photo Essay.

Covering,

Malheur Field Station (MFS)

Central Patrol Road (CPR)

Page Springs (PS)

Fields Oasis (FO)

Left click for a larger gallery view:

ASC 43rd Annual Malheur Field Trip 2013 – Day Two (24 May)

Audubon Society of Corvallis’ 43rd Annual Field Trip to Malheur NWR — Photo Essay.

Covering,

Malheur NWR Headquartes (HQ)

Malheur Field Station (MFS)

Harney Lake Road (HLR)

The Narrows (TN)

Ruh-Red Road (RRR)

Diamond Valley (DV)

Left click for a larger gallery view:

Day 2 – Malheur Trip with the Audubon Society of Corvallis

Day two begins with a stroll up South Coyote Butte before breakfast and then a tour of the north end of the refuge. Nighthawks, a nesting Say’s Phoebe, calling Willets and the ubiquitous Yellow-headed Blackbirds.

We drove the road into Headquarters stopping for the marshland birds; a brief stint at HQ itself; a drive down Harney Lake Rd to view the Golden Eagle nest and pick up some basin sparrows – Lark and Black-throated; a slow drive down the Narrows for the grebes and then the slow dive down Ruh-Red Rd for sage species, more marsh birds and a look at the Pelican Colony. A very cooperative Ferruginous Hawk, a couple a Vesper Sparrows, Blue-winged Teal a few of the highlights.

The day ended with an evening trip out to Benson Landing.  This is a restricted area and we were guided by refuge personnel.  A Short-eared Owl was in the tules with the Cranes.  Bittern were “oonk-a-lunking” every 25 yards, but nary a one was seen.

Personal sightings – 80 species of birds.

eBird – Field Station

eBird – Princeton Rd into HQ

eBird – Malheur NWR HQ

eBird – Harney Lake Rd

eBird – The Narrows

eBird – Ruh-Red Rd.

eBird – Benson Landing

Day 1 – Malheur Trip with the Corvallis Audubon Society

Fred Ramsey has been guiding this trip for over 40 years.  It’s been a pleasure to join him for the last two years.  Day one is a whirlwind tour of a transit from Corvallis to the Malheur Field Station.

Stops along the way target specific species:

Hutton’s Vireo, MacGillivary’s Warbler, Hermit Warbler, American Dipper, Harlequin Duck, Green-tailed Towhee, Calliope Hummingbird and White-throated Swifts.

I came away with 81 species of birds the first day, five more than last year, and this year we had butterflies other than the ubiquitous Cabbage White.  We missed the Harlequin Ducks and MacGillivary’s Warblers.  But with the new staging area at the Benton Co. Fairgrounds we added Acorn Woodpecker, missing from last year’s list.  A notable addition to this year’s list were the Tri-colored Blackbirds just outside of Prineville along Elliot Rd.  Sweet! – thanks Fred!

 

21 october 2011 — malheur

Malheur NWR, Harney, US-OR
Oct 21, 2011 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
Protocol: Traveling
7.0 mile(s)
Comments:     On route to another destination i scanned the narrows, the road into headquarters and a brief walk around headquarters.
28 species (+1 other taxa)

Greater White-fronted Goose  3
Canada Goose  275
American Wigeon  15
Mallard  10
Northern Shoveler  200
Northern Pintail  4
California Quail  6
Pied-billed Grebe  3
Eared Grebe  4
Western Grebe  125     Many were juveniles still begging the adults for food.
Clark’s Grebe  25     Many were juveniles still begging the adults for food at about a ratio of 1.5:1 (Juv to Adult).  I saw 10 to 15 adults and most had chicks following them around. These were located at the Narrows and withing 200 yards of the interpretive pullout as i walked up and down the road.
Great Blue Heron  3
Great Egret  1
Northern Harrier  2
Red-tailed Hawk  2
Prairie Falcon  1
gull sp.  4     Out over Malheur and Harney Lakes
Northern Flicker (Red-shafted)  2
Black-billed Magpie  1
Common Raven  2
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  8
American Robin  2
European Starling  X
Yellow-rumped Warbler  2
Spotted Towhee  1
Song Sparrow  4
White-crowned Sparrow  3
Yellow-headed Blackbird  1
House Sparrow  4

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)